Russ Feingold

It's just really tragic that after all the horrors of the last 1,000 years, we can't leave behind something as primitive as government sponsored execution.

-Russ Feingold

Aberon Waugh

The main objection to killing people as a punishment...is that killing people is wrong.

-Aberon Waugh

Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun

From this day forward, I no longer shall tinker with the machinery of death.

-Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun

John Donne

Any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind.

-John Donne

Helen Prejean

Government... can't be trusted to control its own bureaucrats or collect taxes equitably or fill a pothole, much less decide which of it's citizens to kill.

-Sister Helen Prejean

Opinion

Salem Journal Editorial: Haugen's death penalty case becomes political circus

Gary Haugen death-penalty case has turned into a political circus

It is time to let Gary Haugen die. His death-penalty case has turned into a political circus that neither serves justice nor compels Oregonians to confront the barbarianism of capital punishment. The Oregon Supreme Court heard arguments Thursday in the bizarre, long-running case in which Haugen wants his execution to proceed but Gov. John Kitzhaber has stopped it.

The Death Penalty in Oregon Takes a Sharp Downward Turn in 2012

Kitzhaber declared a moratorium on executions in Oregon

Oregon’s death row is shrinking. Since Governor Kitzhaber declared his moratorium on executions, no new death sentences have been imposed and five death sentences have been overturned.

Letter from OADP Advisory Council Member: Capital punishment makes us all barbarians

Dr. Hugo Bedau in oppostion to the Death Penalty

Dr. Hugo Bedau, a long-time professor of philosophy at Tufts University, died earlier this week ( New York Times , August 17, 2012, p. B14). He was
born in Portland. Professor Bedau devoted much of his career to the systematic, rigorous and socially conscious study of the death penalty and
made his scholarship relevant for legislators, other policy makers, the courts and the legal profession in general. He wrote, among many other

Jeff Ellis, Oregon Capital Resource Center: We shouldn't execute Gary Haugen until we finish the death penalty debate

Jeffrey Ellis is an attorney, the director of the Oregon Capital Resource Center and a member of the board of Oregonians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty

Imagine a death row inmate who is unquestionably ineligible for a death sentence. That person might be intellectually disabled. Or, he may be severely mentally ill. Now, imagine that the governor attempts to remedy this miscarriage of justice through his constitutional clemency power. However, the condemned man refuses to accept the reprieve or commutation of his sentence to life in prison. Maybe the prisoner would find it shameful to acknowledge that he is "mentally retarded." Or, he may harbor delusional beliefs about the reasons for his execution.

OADP Statement on Judge Alexander’s Decision on Haugen Execution

Oregon State Senior Judge Timothy P. Alexander

Oregonians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty (OADP) is expressing disappointment with the decision of State Senior Judge Timothy P. Alexander in the latest round of Gary Haugen hearings. We feel that the Governor is totally within his right to declare a moratorium on executions. And, we believe that this decision will be overturned upon appeal.

Oregon State Bar Bulletin: Let the Debate Begin

First enacted by statute in 1864, the death penalty was repealed by Oregon voters in 1914 and since then has been restored, outlawed again by voters, re-enacted by initiative, deemed unconstitutional and reinstated by initiative in 1984, the last time the issue came up for a vote. Since Gov. John Kitzhaber's announcement in November that he would not allow any further executions as long as he remains in office, debate over capital punishment has once again become a front-burner issue. Interviewed by Cliff Collins, four Oregon lawyers — all with years of experience in the field — express their diverse opinions about a subject that everyone agrees is complex, difficult and worthy of OSB members' attention.

Eugene Register Guard: Until justice is absolutely fair, abolish death penalty

Dr. Todd Huffman of McKenzie Pediatrics in Eugene, OR

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

In April, Connecticut became the fifth state in five years to abolish the death penalty. In Oregon this past December, Gov. John Kitzhaber placed a moratorium on all executions, citing his refusal “to be a part of this compromised and inequitable system any longer.”

That public response to Kitzhaber’s action has been relatively mute perhaps indicates that the time has come for Oregon to join Connecticut and 16 other states in abolishing capital punishment.

Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs declares support of moratorum

Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs

Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs wrote a letter to Governor John Kitzhaber expressing support for his courageous declaration of a moratorium to stop all executions in Oregon. The commission wrote the following letter to Governor Kitzhaber expressing gratitude for the courage for the decision and the reasons such a moratorium is important.

Op-Ed: The Enduring Failure To Protect Against Racism

The Enduring Failure To Protect Against Racism

Twenty five years ago this week in a case entitled McClesky v. Kemp, the United States Supreme Court was faced with disturbing proof that race influences who is sentenced to death in the United States. In Georgia, where the case originated, black defendants charged with killing white victims were 4.3 times as likely to receive a death sentence as white defendants charged with killing black victims.

Op-Ed: Oregon Should Follow Connecticut

Governor Daniel Malloy signs the Connecticut bill to replace the death penalty with an alternative punishment

On April 12, 2012, the Connecticut legislature replaced its death penalty with life in prison with no possibility of release. When Governor Daniel Malloy signs the bill into law, Connecticut will be the 17th state and the fifth in recent years to replace the death penalty with an alternative punishment that ensures both the safety of its citizens, but also guarantees that no innocent person will be executed.

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